Assessment of Body Composition, Lung Function and Immunological Markers in Primary School Children

BLIS
Assessment of Body Composition, Lung Function and Immunological Markers in Primary School Children

There is increasing evidence that both diet and body composition can have a significant effect on lung function. In addition, weight itself does not tell us the whole story as body composition (for example, total body water or body fat) may be variable regardless of a child's weight.The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between lung function, body composition and immune/inflammatory factors. Children aged 6-11 years, with and without asthma, will be able to participate. We would like to include children with a variety of body shapes and sizes. 

To be involved in our study, please contact: Bliss@uq.edu.au 

Breathing for Life study

BLT
Breathing for Life

We know that a family history of asthma is an important reason why some children develop asthma. This research will investigate whether events which happen in pregnancy or early life contribute to the development of asthma in children whose mothers have asthma. Mothers who enrolled in the Breathing for Life Trial, a ransomised trial of fractional exhaled nitric oxide based management of asthma during pregnancy, are offered the opportunity to enrol their babies onto the follow-up infant study that looks at perinatal outcome and infant and childhood respiratory health. All babies born to mothers who participated in the Breathing for LIfe Trial during their pregnancy are able to participate.

contact: BLTinfants@uq.edu.au  

Kids and Chemicals in the home study

Help us study how Australian children are exposed to chemcials that are commonly found in our homes.
The ‘Kids and Chemicals in the Home Study’ is a Queensland first study, investigating how patterns of chemical use in homes influence children’s exposure to chemicals. 

In recent years researchers have begun focusing more on how the chemicals that we might be exposed to in early life influence our heath.  There is concern that some of the chemicals that are commonly found in products in the home might disrupt the body’s normal functioning and development.  The chemicals that we are specifically investigating are pesticides, specifically pyrethroid and organophosphate insecticides, and flame retardants.  These chemicals are found in all homes in low levels.  However, in Australia in particular, we don’t know a lot about how much of these chemicals babies are exposed to.  We need to know more about how much of these chemicals babies are exposed to before we can study the health effects properly. The aim of this study is to help provide an easy way to figure out what chemicals and how much of those chemicals Australian babies are exposed to in the home.  

In this current study we want to figure out how well an online tool predicts exposure to common pesticides and flame retardants.  The data we are collecting will also provide us with information that will help us determine how much of these chemicals Australian children are exposed to and how they are exposed to these chemicals.  

What does taking part in this study involve?

  1. Take biological samples over a two-day period
  2. Complete a questionnaire

contact: karin.english@uqconnect.edu.au